Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of knackery.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Then it was that the thoughtful care of Mrs Greenow, in having sent Jeannette with brushes, combs, clean handkerchiefs, and other little knick-knackeries, became so apparent.

    Can You Forgive Her?

  • Then it was that the thoughtful care of Mrs Greenow, in having sent Jeannette with brushes, combs, clean handkerchiefs, and other little knick-knackeries, became so apparent.

    Can you forgive her?

  • 'No, it is John's; I can't devise knick-knackeries, but he is a thorough old bachelor, and has been doing all sorts of things to the house, which have made it more tolerable.'

    Heartsease, Or, the Brother's Wife

  • When we were (about thirty or forty) all stuffed into the cabinet of gems and knick-knackeries, in a corner of one of the galleries, I told Rogers that it 'felt like being in the watchhouse.'

    Life of Lord Byron With His Letters And Journals

  • Mrs Greenow, in having sent Jeannette with brushes, combs, clean handkerchiefs, and other little knick-knackeries, became so apparent.

    Can You Forgive Her?

  • Lord of Warwick with some nowches [buckles and other ornaments] and knackeries, that he takes out as gifts and exemplars of English work.

    The Last of the Barons — Volume 01

  • Lord of Warwick with some nowches [buckles and other ornaments] and knackeries, that he takes out as gifts and exemplars of English work.

    The Last of the Barons — Complete

  • And besides books and works of art, he has no end of antique knick-knackeries, none of which we had any time to look at; among others some instruments with which nuns used to torture themselves in their convents by way of penance.

    Passages from the French and Italian Notebooks, Volume 2.

  • And besides books and works of art, he has no end of antique knick-knackeries, none of which we had any time to look at; among others some instruments with which nuns used to torture themselves in their convents by way of penance.

    Passages from the French and Italian Notebooks, Complete

  • When we were (about thirty or forty) all stuffed into the cabinet of gems and knick-knackeries, in a corner of one of the galleries, I told Rogers that it 'felt like being in the watchhouse.'

    Life of Lord Byron, Vol. 5 (of 6) With His Letters and Journals

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