Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb archaic Third-person singular simple present indicative form of knock.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From knock +‎ -eth, the archaic third-person singular present tense suffix

Examples

  • Therewith he heard a voice saying, “Who knocketh at the door of the treasure, unknowing how to solve the secrets?”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • There everyone who asks receiveth thee, and everyone who seeks finds thee, and to everyone that knocketh boldly it is speedily opened.

    The Love of Books : The Philobiblon of Richard de Bury

  • And ye yourselves like unto men that wait for their lord, when he will return from the wedding; that when he cometh and knocketh, they may open unto him immediately.

    Villaraigosa And Nunez Cut And Run - Video Report

  • And ye yourselves like unto men that wait for their lord, when he will return from the wedding; that when he cometh and knocketh, they may open unto him immediately.

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

    Villaraigosa And Nunez Cut And Run - Video Report

  • I sleep, but my heart waketh: it is the voice of my beloved that knocketh.

    Samuel Ibn Tibbon

  • For EVERY ONE that asketh, receiveth; and he that seeketh, findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

    An American Tragedy

  • My Husband knocketh at the doore, and now he will perceive the occasion of our so familiar acquaintance.

    The Decameron

  • As commonly after actions of evill, Repentance knocketh at the doore of Conscience, and urgeth a guilty remembrance, with some sence of sorrow: so was it now with sweet Sir Simon, who survayin over all his vailes of offering Candles, the validity of his yearely benefits, and all comming nothing neere the summe of (scarce halfe) sixe and twenty

    The Decameron

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