Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A wide, two-handled bowl used in ancient Greece and Rome for mixing wine and water.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An ancient Greek vessel for mixing water and wine.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See crater, 1.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Greek krātēr.

Examples

  • Mr. Hoving, who appreciated the publicity value of the controversy, dubbed the krater the "hot pot."

    A Celebrity in Low-Key Digs

  • Even before the vase, known as a krater, went on display, experts contended that it had been wrested illicitly from an Etruscan tomb near Rome.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Just a few of the most famous objects, including the Euphronios krater stolen by tomb robbers and recovered three years ago from New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Sarcophagus of the Spouses, an enchanting icon of connubial conviviality, rate display cases of their own.

    The Joy of Museums That Live in the Past

  • I spent over 10 minutes in the room with the krater on a June afternoon, and no one else came in.

    Maybe It's Time to Re-Examine Policy on Antiquities

  • The krater was in one of the two cases lit by white "sparkle" lights.

    Maybe It's Time to Re-Examine Policy on Antiquities

  • The krater was basically a punchbowl, if you were serving watered wine, but sometimes it was used like a champagne bucket fill it with ice, put your amphora or whatever in it, and the wine stayed cool.

    SPARTACUS: episode 10

  • Many of the works here tell a layered story: A volute-krater -- a vessel used to mix water and wine -- is illustrated with two ceremonies: a formal one with a woman preparing to make an offering to the gods; the other, a frolic of maenads and satyrs.

    Worshipping Women: Onassis Center

  • (The krater belonged to the ancient Etruscans, but they of course ­imported it from Greece.)

    A Celebrity in Low-Key Digs

  • "No figure of Christ on the cross I'd ever seen matched this image," wrote the Met's former director Thomas Hoving about his first look at the krater in 1972.

    A Celebrity in Low-Key Digs

  • Ms. Boitani also notes that the current display is only temporary, and that later this year the museum will unveil a permanent exhibition dedicated to finds from Cerveteri, placing the krater squarely in its Etruscan context.

    A Celebrity in Low-Key Digs

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