Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any lizard of the family Lacertidae

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any lizard of the family Lacertidae, a family of Old World terrestrial lizard.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A lizard of the restricted family Lacertidæ.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. Old World terrestrial lizard

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Vanhooydonck and R. van Damme, ‘Omnivory in lacertid lizards: adaptive evolution or restraint’, Journal of Evolutionary Biology 17 2004, 974–84.

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

  • Vanhooydonck and R. van Damme, ‘Omnivory in lacertid lizards: adaptive evolution or restraint’,Journal of Evolutionary Biology 17 2004, 974–84; photo courtesy Anthony Herrel.

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

  • ‘Omnivory in lacertid lizards: adaptive evolution or constraint?’

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

  • A Fine line between sex and unisexuality: The phylogenetic constraints on parthenogenesis in lacertid lizards.

    Biological diversity in the Caucasus

  • There are also painted frog Discoglossus pictus, three species of toad, two harmless species of snake and one lacertid.

    Ichkeul National Park, Tunisia

  • Ecomorphological analysis of aerial performance in a non-specialized lacertid lizard,

    ScienceBlogs Channel : Life Science

  • Most lacertid lizards are content scurrying in and out of nooks and crannies in walls and between rocks.

    innovations-report

  • Intrigued by all aspects of lacertid locomotion, Bieke Vanhooydonck from the University of Antwerp and her colleagues, Anthony Herrel and Peter Aerts, decided to find out whether neon blue tailed tree lizards really glide.

    innovations-report

  • Vanhooydonck B, Van Damme R (2003) Relationships between locomotor performance, microhabitat use and antipredator behaviour in lacertid lizards.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • Key endemic reptile groups include geckos (Gekkonidae), chameleons (Chameleonidae), skinks (Scincidae), lacertid lizards (Lacertidae), worm-snakes (Typhlopidae), and true snakes (Atractaspididae, Elapidae, and Colubridae).

    Northern Zanzibar-Inhambane coastal forest mosaic

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