Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Ware treated or decorated with lacquer. See lacquer, 2.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Alternative form of lacquerware.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Instead, my hand came down on the long red lacquer-ware box beside it, tipping open the top to reveal a collection of hair - and hat-pins and the single carved ivory chop-stick that she had used to tease loose portions of hair.

    Locked Rooms

  • Instead, my hand came down on the long red lacquer-ware box beside it, tipping open the top to reveal a collection of hair - and hat-pins and the single carved ivory chop-stick that she had used to tease loose portions of hair.

    Locked Rooms

  • She paused beside the guard and lifted a lacquer-ware box from the basket.

    Vulcan’s Glory

  • She paused beside the guard and lifted a lacquer-ware box from the basket.

    Vulcan’s Glory

  • She paused beside the guard and lifted a lacquer-ware box from the basket.

    Vulcan’s Glory

  • Folding screens and hanging pictures painted by celebrated artists, costly lacquer-ware, bronze, china, and other heirlooms are tastefully distributed about the room.

    The Little Tea Book

  • We never dreamed that our ideal England was dead and buried, that the actual England was not the marble goddess of our idolatry, but a poor Brummagem image, coarse lacquer-ware and tawdry paint!

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 6, No 4, August, 1864 Devoted To Literature And National Policy

  • Gangs of coolies, strung in Indian file along the paths, are met, carrying lacquer-ware from some interior town to Fat-shau and Canton.

    Around the World on a Bicycle - Volume II From Teheran To Yokohama

  • They were represented in lacquer-ware of many kinds, on the sides and covers of carven boxes, on tobacco-pouches, on sleeve-buttons, in designs for hairpins, on women's combs, even on chopsticks.

    Kokoro Japanese Inner Life Hints

  • House and lands first, -- then, article by article, all things not necessary to existence -- heirlooms, trinkets, costly robes, crested lacquer-ware -- passed cheaply to those whom misery makes rich, and whose wealth is called by the people _Namida no kane_, -- "the Money of Tears."

    Kokoro Japanese Inner Life Hints

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