Definitions

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  • n. Plural form of laisse.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It consists of 4002 verses, written in langue d'oil, grouped in stanzas or "laisses" of irregular length, in the heroic pentameter, having the same assonant rhyme, and each ending with "aoi," a word no one has succeeded in translating satisfactorily.

    The Book of the Epic

  • "laisses," or stanzas, of irregular length, and contains about three thousand seven hundred and eight lines.

    National Epics

  • * Incredibly, a man and his daughter have seen the dogs sans laisses*:

    Braise The Dog

  • * Incredibly, a man and his daughter have seen the dogs sans laisses*: Two long-haired dogs?

    Braise The Dog

  • You see - what we have is a very laisses faire ('scuse spelling) economy which fails to give us any cogency and a political class that rides the wave as precariously as a body-boarder on a surf-board (heads-up Mutley).

    Poltical Language ( Ask the Focus Group )

  • The chances are that it was written at first in regularly framed assonance verses of fourteen to sixteen syllables — each breaking normally into half-lines of seven to eight syllables, such as now form the usual romance or ballad line — and that these verses constituted stanzas or laisses of irregular length, such as we find in the Old French

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • Comparatively short, these chansons de geste are written in lines of six syllables which are made into couplets, or laisses, with assonances, or imperfect rhymes (such, as e.g., perde and superbe).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • Philippe II et Granvelle (Brussels, 1842); GACHARD, Inventaire des papiers laisses par le cardinal de Granvelle a Madrid; IDEM,

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • Much more is imparted by the equally peculiar character of the metre -- the long _tirades_ or _laisses_, assonanced or mono-rhymed paragraphs in decasyllables or alexandrines, which, to those who have once caught their harmony, have an indescribable and unparalleled charm.

    A History of the French Novel, Vol. 1 From the Beginning to 1800

  • It is written in mono-rhymed _laisses_ of the famous metre which owes its name and perhaps its popularity to the use of it in this romance.

    The Flourishing of Romance and the Rise of Allegory (Periods of European Literature, vol. II)

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