Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun anatomy Plural form of lamina.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Better known as "laminas" in Mexico, retablos are small oil paintings on tin, zinc, wood or copper, which were used in home altars to honor and worship the almost infinite number of Catholic saints.

    The Daily News - News

  • Better known as "laminas" in Mexico, retablos are small oil paintings on tin, zinc, wood or copper, which were used in home altars to honor and worship the almost infinite number of Catholic saints.

    The Daily News - News

  • Better known as "laminas" in Mexico, retablos are small oil paintings on tin, zinc, wood or copper, which were used in home altars to honor and worship the almost infinite number of Catholic saints.

    The Daily News - News

  • Better known as "laminas" in Mexico, retablos are small oil paintings on tin, zinc, wood or copper, which were used in home altars to honor and worship the almost infinite number of Catholic saints.

    The Daily News - News

  • Better known as "laminas" in Mexico, retablos are small oil paintings on tin, zinc, wood or copper, which were used in home altars to honor and worship the almost infinite number of Catholic saints.

    The Daily News - News

  • Better known as "laminas" in Mexico, retablos are small oil paintings on tin, zinc, wood or copper, which were used in home altars to honor and worship the almost infinite number of Catholic saints.

    The Daily News - News

  • Better known as "laminas" in Mexico, retablos are small oil paintings on tin, zinc, wood or copper, which were used in home altars to honor and worship the almost infinite number of Catholic saints.

    The Daily News - News

  • Better known as "laminas" in Mexico, retablos are small oil paintings on tin, zinc, wood or copper, which were used in home altars to honor and worship the almost infinite number of Catholic saints.

    The Daily News - News

  • All secondary properties, such as color and taste, will be explained as epiphenomena of atomic combinations, and perception of things at a distance by the continual emission of infinitesimally thin laminas from objects, which maintain the relevant features of the source (in the case of vision, for example, the laminas will preserve the atomic patterns specific to the color and shape of the object) and directly stimulate the relevant sense organ.

    Epicurus

  • But the flimsy laminas as they float through the air can become distorted or interfere with one another, and thus the upper part of a human figure may get loosely attached to the lower part of a horse's.

    Epicurus

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