Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of lampion.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • At the French Chancellerie they had six more lampions in their illumination than ours had; but our transparency, which represented the young Couple advancing and Discord flying away, with the most ludicrous likeness to the French Ambassador, beat the French picture hollow; and I have no doubt got Tapeworm the advancement and the Cross of the Bath which he subsequently attained.

    Vanity Fair

  • A magical and unique spectacle it certainly is, with the well-known change from the paper lanterns to the flaring lampions.

    Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910

  • While speaking, I fancied I could hear that cadenced yell of the public to which the famous song, "Des lampions, des lampions," was set.

    The Lock and Key Library The most interesting stories of all nations: Real life

  • Every one is very confident of the success of the French Army, and people go about in the streets singing "À Berlin" to the tune of "Les lampions."

    In the Courts of Memory, 1858 1875; from Contemporary Letters

  • These two unconventional Bohemian lovers, strolling together at night, at their own sweet will, see down the court along which they are strolling, three lampions flare, which indicate some big place or other where the "respectables" do congregate; and the woman says to her companion, with a humorous sarcasm, "Put forward your best foot!" that is, we must be very correct passing along here in this brilliant light.

    An Introduction to the Study of Robert Browning's Poetry

  • While speaking, I fancied I could hear that cadenced yell of the public to which the famous song, “Des lampions, des lampions,” was set.

    Memoirs of Robert-Houdin

  • At the French Chancellerie they had six more lampions in their illumination than ours had; but our transparency, which represented the young Couple advancing and Discord flying away, with the most ludicrous likeness to the French Ambassador, beat the French picture hollow; and

    Vanity Fair

  • The whole facade of the palace, from the base of the lowest pillars up to the very turrets of the pavilions, comprising the entablatures, &c. was decorated with thousands of _lampions_, whence issued a steady, glaring light.

    Paris as It Was and as It Is

  • Although the body of light proceeding from _lampions_ of this description braves the weather, yet the smoke which they produce, is no inconsiderable drawback on the effect of their splendour.

    Paris as It Was and as It Is

  • By way of parenthesis, I must inform you that these _lampions_ are nothing more than little circular earthen pans, somewhat resembling those which are used in

    Paris as It Was and as It Is

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