Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as land-slide.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He died and was buried at Halae, near the sea, where it so happened that, after his burial, a land-slip took place on the point of the shore, and the sea, flowing in, surrounded his tomb, and made it inaccessible to the foot of man.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • The southern entrance to the gorge bears signs of human habitation: a parallelogram of stones, 120 paces by 91, has been partially buried by a land-slip (?); and there are remnants of a dam measuring about

    The Land of Midian

  • I observed at one place a tremendous land-slip, caused by the water undermining the soil.

    Notes of a Twenty-Five Years' Service in the Hudson's Bay Territory Volume I.

  • If there is any section, by a stream side, or digging, or land-slip, look for strata, stone or brick walls and floor levels, and for any distinctive potsherds; observing levels as before.

    How to Observe in Archaeology

  • On our way down we observed a land-slip, or avalanche of earth, that had just tumbled into the river.

    Notes of a Twenty-Five Years' Service in the Hudson's Bay Territory Volume II. (of 2)

  • ” He died and was buried at Halæ, near the sea, where it so happened that, after his burial, a land-slip took place on the point of the shore, and the sea, flowing in, surrounded his tomb, and made it inaccessible to the foot of man.

    Antony

  • It seemed to me, that more than the land-slip was necessary to account for these.

    The House on the Borderland: Chapter 11

  • Besides being thick with mud, the water is found to be of that icy, cutting temperature peculiar to cold brine, and after wading about in it for fifteen minutes, first finding a fordable place, and then carrying clothes and wheel across, I emerge on to the bank formed by the land-slip looking as woebegone a specimen of humanity as can well be imagined.

    Around the World on a Bicycle - Volume II From Teheran To Yokohama

  • Farther on a great land-slip displayed for a length of 40 m. brilliant red earth over a stratum 60 ft. thick of white chalk.

    Across Unknown South America

  • Fredegar, for instance, knew of the sudden appearance of a hot spring in the Lake of Thun, and Gregory of Tours notes that the land-slip in 563 at the foot of the Dent du Midi, above the point where the Rhine enters the Lake of Geneva, was a dreadful event.

    The Development of the Feeling for Nature in the Middle Ages and Modern Times

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