Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Long, thin jaws or chops; hence, a thin visage.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Hornblower could imagine the lantern-jaws working in surprise, and he ignored the mumblings.

    Hornblower And The Hotspur

  • His appearance was that of an elderly _hidalgo_, dressed in mourning, with moustaches of iron-gray carefully waxed and twisted around a pair of lantern-jaws.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 12, No. 72, October, 1863

  • There were several others of whom I was not so sure, sitting at the other side of the table, but I conjecture that both Fielding and Richardson were among them, and I could swear to the lantern-jaws and cadaverous visage of Lawrence Sterne.

    The Captain of the Polestar and other Tales

  • There were several others of whom I was not so sure, sitting at the other side of the table, but I conjecture that both Fielding and Richardson were among them, and I could swear to the lantern-jaws and cadaverous visage of

    The Captain of the Polestar

  • When he came to the surface and looked up, he saw through a cloud of smoke on the rail the lantern-jaws of Mr. Todd working convulsively on pipe and cigar, and heard the angry utterance: "Yes, d-- n ye, I smoke."

    "Where Angels Fear to Tread" and Other Stories of the Sea

  • The other was a god-like creature, a poet by profession, with long lantern-jaws, grey eyes deeply set, and a mass of curly black hair, from which the face with its pallor and its distinction, shone dimly out like the portrait of a Cinquecento.

    Delia Blanchflower

  • His appearance was that of an elderly hidalgo, dressed in mourning, with mustaches of iron-gray carefully waxed and twisted round a pair of lantern-jaws.

    The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Tales With Condensed Novels, Spanish and American Legends, and Earlier Papers

  • His appearance was that of an elderly hidalgo, dressed in mourning, with mustaches of iron-gray carefully waxed and twisted around a pair of lantern-jaws.

    Legends and Tales

  • The one was the black shock-head of the groom; the other, graced with a long thrum nightcap, showed a grizzled pate, and a grave caricatured countenance, which the hook-nose and lantern-jaws proclaimed to belong to the Gallic minister of good cheer, whose praises he had heard sung forth on the preceding evening.

    Peveril of the Peak

  • Nor must we omit his meagerness and entire featureliness, face and frame, which Cervantes gives us at once: "It is said that his surname was 'Quixada' or 'Quesada,'" &c. -- even in this trifle showing an exquisite judgment; -- just once insinuating the association of 'lantern-jaws' into the reader's mind, yet not retaining it obtrusively like the names in old farces and in the Pilgrim's

    Literary Remains, Volume 1

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