Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Pandanus tectorius, a tree common in Hawaii, also known as the screwpine.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun Polynesian screw pine

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Hawaiian lauhala, from hala ("pandanus").

Examples

  • The eyes of all were intently fixed upon the solitary sleeper who lay on his back on a lauhala mat a hundred feet away under the monkey-pod trees.

    THE BONES OF KAHEKILI

  • Any man of all the men who work for me, feed out of my hand, and let me do their thinking for them -- me, who work harder than any of them, who eats no more than any of them, and who can sleep on no more than one lauhala mat at a time like any of them?

    THE BONES OF KAHEKILI

  • And the giant harpooner was still roaring, his the last sounds in my ear, as I fell back on the lauhala mat, and was to all things for the time as one dead.

    THE BONES OF KAHEKILI

  • The clothes ranged from fussy missionary muu-muus to body-tracing shapes in fresh colors and geometric leaf prints; others used hand-beaten tapa bark cloth, woven lauhala fronds, feathers and other traditional materials in startlingly original couture.

    Mindy Pennybacker: Food Rule 5-0: Go Whole Hog; Never Eat Wild Predators

  • There were a dress and tunic decorated with translucent cut-out scallops by Marques Marzan, a lauhala weaver and native practitioner affiliated with Bishop Museum.

    Mindy Pennybacker: Food Rule 5-0: Go Whole Hog; Never Eat Wild Predators

  • The pandanus, or lauhala, is one of the most striking features of the islands.

    The Hawaiian Archipelago

  • No song of birds, or busy hum of insects, accompanied the rustle of the lauhala leaves and the low murmur of the surf.

    The Hawaiian Archipelago

  • The brown tattooed limbs of one man are stretched across the mat, the others are sitting cross-legged, making lauhala leis.

    The Hawaiian Archipelago

  • I have just encamped under a lauhala tree, with my saddle inverted for a pillow, my horse tied by a long lariat to a guava bush, my gear, saddle-bags, and rations for two days lying about, and my saddle blanket drying in the sun.

    The Hawaiian Archipelago

  • It is only the tropical trees, specially the lauhala or “screw pine,” the whimsical shapes of outlying ridges, which now and then lie like the leaves in a book, and the strange forms of extinct craters, which distinguish it from some of our most beautiful park scenery, such as Windsor Great Park or Belvoir.

    The Hawaiian Archipelago

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