Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of laundress.
  • v. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of laundress.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Well, with regard to lovers the account book of their laundresses is the most faithful historic record as well as the most impartial account of their various amours.

    The Physiology of Marriage, Part 3

  • Similar cakes are also bestowed on the hangers-on of the establishment, such as laundresses, sempstresses, charwomen, etc.

    A Righte Merrie Christmasse The Story of Christ-Tide

  • At bedtime they had given me a wooden tub such as laundresses use, and filled it for my morning bath.

    The Princess Passes

  • Then he melted pitch and wax with sulphur, which he drank down as it flamed: I saw it flaming in his mouthe a good while; he also took up a thick piece of iron, such as laundresses use to put in their smoothing - boxes, when it was fiery hot, held it between his teeth, then in his hand, and threw it about like a stone; but this I observ'd he cared not to hold very long.

    Miracle Mongers and Their Methods

  • Then he melted pitch and wax with sulphur, which he drank down as it flamed: I saw it flaming in his mouthe a good while; he also took up a thick piece of iron, such as laundresses use to put in their smoothing-boxes, when it was fiery hot, held it between his teeth, then in his hand, and threw it about like a stone; but this I observ'd he cared not to hold very long.

    The Miracle Mongers, an Exposé

  • Your premodern army will have cooks and laundresses and camp followers (aka prostitutes, for those unfamiliar with the euphemism).

    The value of the Bechdel Test at SF Novelists

  • British regulations typically assigned six women to each 100 men as laundresses and hospital nurses, but most high commanders regarded them as nuisances.

    George Washington’s First War

  • G2, 10 March is confusing the modern wringer with a box mangle, a huge, heavy contraption filled with rocks, used by laundresses to wring and smooth household linen.

    Letters: No logo for Labour

  • By 1910, Walker had built a factory, had numerous beauty salons and had trained hundreds of women whose only job options otherwise "would have been as maids, laundresses and sharecroppers," Bundles told me.

    Gerit Quealy: Forgotten Women: Madam C. J. Walker, Beauty Entrepreneur

  • And to reason it stood that the individual in immaculate white must possess many changes and command the labour of laundresses to keep his changes immaculate.

    Chapter 15

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