Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of leash.
  • v. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of leash.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Intellectual and personal integrity for the citizens, briefly speaking an internet that has not been transformed into a government channel by lobby-marinated courts and EU politicians in leashes, is arguably more important than the needs of a primarily industrial scene of literature and music, which is rapidly crumbling away already within the lifetime of the authors.

    Boing Boing

  • My initial thoughts when seeing kids on leashes is 'lack of discipline'.

    Kid leashes: Demeaning or useful?

  • As one who was bitten early by the Blackberry bug, I can attest that the pull of these wireless electronic leashes is often too strong to resist.

    Is MySpace Good for Society? A Freakonomics Quorum - Freakonomics Blog - NYTimes.com

  • But, "I forgot to bring the dogs 'leashes" -- two or more dogs.

    Peter Clothier: Apostrophe

  • The heddle is a row of twines, cords, or wires called leashes, which are stretched vertically between two horizontal bars or rods, placed about a foot apart.

    Home Life in Colonial Days

  • "Kinderkords" (also known as leashes; they allow "three full feet of freedom for both you and your child") and Baby Kneepads (as if babies don't come prepadded).

    TIME.com: Top Stories

  • That means no killing, ever, no zoos, no cages, no eating them, no using them in research, no riding -- not even keeping them on leashes, which is why I found the pictures of these animal rights extremists walking dogs on leashes by Ringach's house so startling.

    ScienceBlogs Channel : Life Science

  • Stores began marketing stove-knob covers and "Kinderkords" (also known as leashes; they allow "three full feet of freedom for both you and your child") and Baby Kneepads (as if babies don't come prepadded).

    TIME.com: Top Stories

  • When you were little, they weren't called "leashes", they were called "baby harnesses" and no one thought anything of it, it was a way to keep a hold on your toddler, especially if you were carrying a baby.

    Kid leashes: Demeaning or useful?

  • But the dogs we'd had just ran freely around the neighborhood, where people didn't seem to use words like "leashes" and "pooper scoopers."

    Anna David: HuffPost Exclusive! Excerpt: Party Girl

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