Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The office of lector.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Finally, one of the most prominent German publishing companies (C. H.Beck Verlag, since 1763) examined the book and through its lectorate decided that '' the deciphering of the vision with the 132 Greek letters and from this following scientific proof for the existence of God is for sure a great event ''.

    Scientific Proof for the Existence of God !

  • It occurs to Humble Elias that since US Conservatism is less a doctrine and more a serious of interlocking myths loaded up with sheer fantasy, that the United States is paying a huge tribute in other people's blood and money so that Jeff Jacoby and the thirty percent of the lectorate who back Bush to the hilt can go on living in a political Candyland for a few more precious years.

    The Chimes at Midnight

  • A Sapa correspondent reported only about 9,2 percent of the lectorate - or 926 people of a possible 12000 - had voted by 4pm in Wednesday's Boksburg by-election for a new Ward 11 councillor.

    ANC Daily News Briefing

  • The lectorate involves no obligation of celibacy or of any other kind.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • At an early age he entered the Order of St. Dominic in his native town; he obtained, in 1590 the lectorate in theology and was at the same time appointed regent of studies in the convent of St. Paul at Valladolid.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • St. Viator, lector of the cathedral at Lyons, France, lived in the fourth century and is the earliest type of the teacher of the cathedral schools, In the exercise of the then important functions of the lectorate, namely in reading and expounding the Scriptures to the people and in catechizing the children, he displayed that zeal and ability for which he was held in such high esteem by his bishop,

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 15: Tournely-Zwirner

  • This seems to indicate that all clerics did not necessarily pass through the four lower orders; as a matter of fact the Council of Sardica (can. xiii) mentions only the lectorate as obligatory before receiving the diaconate.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • This choice having been approved by the pseudo-synod, in six days Photius ran the gamut of ecclesiastical orders from the lectorate to the episcopate.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

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