Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A weakening of articulation causing a consonant to become lenis (soft).

Etymologies

From lenis + -ition (modelled on German Lenierung). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • This means that, as in Latin, the distribution of primary /f/ was defective in Etruscan. see linkFirst, Dosuna observes the same p-lenition as I've mentioned many timed before on Paleoglot, minus the conditioning by u.

    Archive 2009-12-01

  • If anything, the case for lip-rounding causing lenition of /p/ is even stronger given the co-articulation.

    Concern trolls and the Etruscan bilabial 'f'

  • Now, this is a matter of detail perhaps but worth noting since p has occasionally eroded to f in Etruscan, particularly next to tautosyllabic u, and this sort of lenition can only rationally happen with a bilabial phoneme, not a labiodental one.

    Some observations concerning Woodard's The Ancient Languages of Europe

  • As I've remarked before on my blog, Etruscan p consistently shows lenition to a bilabial fricative /ΙΈ/ whenever it neighbours the high rounded back vowel u.

    Archive 2009-10-01

  • Yes, bilabial fricatives should be unsurprising, but Etruscan u-triggered lenition is however not common knowledge, so even if you personally don't find that interesting, others certainly will.

    Concern trolls and the Etruscan bilabial 'f'

  • Strangely, Japanese too shows lenition of dental plosives neighbouring back vowels ie. specifically, the high back unrounded vowel u.

    Linear A treatment of consonant clusters

  • "It's interesting that you actually propose just the same result of both those particles, except you call it word-final lenition while for Kortlandt it's pre-*i lenition."

    Laryngeal overdose in the Indo-European second person

  • It's interesting that you actually propose just the same result of both those particles, except you call it word-final lenition while for Kortlandt it's pre-*i lenition.

    Laryngeal overdose in the Indo-European second person

  • The f in this lexeme is merely lenition of p neighbouring tautosyllabic u, particularly when the next syllable contains a front vowel.

    Disproving a particular translation of TLE 193 once and for all

  • A cursory look on Google reveals that even Frisian follows German on this "wolkom yn", whilst Welsh insists on "croeso i [+lenition]" rather than "croeso yn [+nasalization]".

    On welcoming in

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