Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A passport or permit to pass, or to go or be abroad.
  • n. A pass or paper furnished to a vessel in order to prevent detention by a ship of war; a safe-conduct.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Red Hold; this man, who was old and wise and nothing feeble of body, made much of Birdalone and her folk, and was glad of them when he knew that they had the seal and let-pass of Geoffrey of

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • The inland trade is almost perfectly free, and the greater part of goods may be carried from one end of the kingdom to the other, without requiring any permit or let-pass, without being subject to question, visit, or examination from the revenue officers.

    II. Book V. Of the Sources of the General or Public Revenue of the Society

  • Hold; this man, who was old and wise and nothing feeble of body, made much of Birdalone and her folk, and was glad of them when he knew that they had the seal and let-pass of Geoffrey of Lea; wherefore he gave them to eat and drink, and lodged them in his own house, and made them the best of cheer.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Tree is no good let-pass to flourish in honest men's faces; specialiter if they be monks.

    The Well at the World's End: a tale

  • "Where hast thou the said let-pass?" said Clement.

    The Well at the World's End: a tale

  • If this be other than the Lord of Utterbol, he will see our let-pass and let us alone; or if it be he indeed, what harm shall he do to the bearers of his own pass?

    The Well at the World's End: a tale

  • But now suffer me to send a swain for my horse and arms, and another to the captain of the watch at West-gate Bar that he be ready to open to me and three of my friends, and to send me a let-pass for the occasion.

    The Well at the World's End: a tale

  • Ralph heeded him naught, but was glad that his let-pass was shown to be good for something; but he could see that the minstrel was nigh sick for fear and was shaking like an aspen leaf, and it was long ere he found his tongue again.

    The Well at the World's End: a tale

  • They had a let-pass through the lands of the Baron of Deepdale, but he would not suffer Sir Godrick to take any men from his country.

    The Sundering Flood

  • A full set of ships 'papers seems to have consisted, at least in Dutch practice, of a bill of health (see doc.no. 197), a sea-letter or let-pass (docs.nos. 129, 130), a muster-roll (_rôle d'équipage_) or shipping-articles of the crew, and a clearance for the cargo.] _Interro.

    Privateering and Piracy in the Colonial Period Illustrative Documents

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