Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A class in an art school or academy for which the living model, usually nude, is posed.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Patricia gazed gloomily at the door of the life-class room.

    Miss Pat at School

  • It was all well enough for Jim to say later that he didn't dare to have the canvases moved, for he had stuck behind them all sorts of chorus girl photographs and life-class crayons that were not for Aunt Selina's eye, besides four empty siphons, two full ones, and three bottles of whisky.

    When a Man Marries

  • In France the first women to enter a life-class with men were two Americans, and at the time, though it caused much talk, they were admired for it.

    Art and Handicraft in the Woman's Building of the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893

  • In after life when his habit of late rising had become a stock subject of banter among his intimate friends, he would tell with unwonted pride how in earlier years he used to rise at six A.M. once a week in order to attend a life-class held before breakfast.

    Recollections of Dante Gabriel Rossetti

  • Street, but in the mornings he was accustomed to study in the life-class at the School of Design.

    Vandover and the Brute

  • The model in the life-class had just been posed for the week, and the others had begun work.

    Vandover and the Brute

  • Young Haight had called for more drinks, ordering, however, mineral water for himself, and Vandover was just telling about posing the female models in a certain life-class to which he belonged, when he looked up and broke off, exclaiming:

    Vandover and the Brute

  • On the following Monday as he worked in the life-class, Vandover was thinking, or, rather, trying not to think, of what he had done the

    Vandover and the Brute

  • He never thought of attending the life-class at the art school; long since he had given up his downtown studio.

    Vandover and the Brute

  • Charmian had reported everywhere that she had genius, and in the absence of proofs to the contrary the life-class accepted her as if she had.

    The Coast of Bohemia

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