Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The owner of a life-estate; one who holds lands, etc., for the term of his own or another's life.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Men come and bask in the halo of consols and acres that beams round about him: the reverence is transferred with the estate; of which, with all its advantages, pleasures, respect, and good-will, he in turn becomes the life-tenant.

    The History of Pendennis

  • It is still there -- a life-tenant -- for its lease cannot be broken till memory dies.

    St. Cuthbert's

  • Mary Leigh, who had been for twenty years life-tenant of the

    Jane Austen, Her Life and Letters A Family Record

  • Mary: life-tenant of Stoneleigh, dies 1806, 194; her brother's curious will, 195

    Jane Austen, Her Life and Letters A Family Record

  • Often, the life estate is owned by one person, and the remainder by a stranger, or remote branch of the family, whom the life-tenant has no desire to benefit.

    Farm drainage The Principles, Processes, and Effects of Draining Land with Stones, Wood, Plows, and Open Ditches, and Especially with Tiles

  • Smith, his sister, of which estate he is the life-tenant.

    Board of Visitors minutes

  • He expected to treat with the Indiana heirs and obtain their respective interests in the fee, which no doubt he would have been able to acquire very cheaply but for the intevening accident of war, as the life-tenant was yet of middle age and the succession consequently of little probable value to living reversioners.

    Bricks without Straw A Novel

  • Indiana heirs and obtain their respective interests in the fee, which no doubt he would have been able to acquire very cheaply but for the intevening accident of war, as the life-tenant was yet of middle age and the succession consequently of little probable value to living reversioners.

    Bricks Without Straw

  • This, however, he had not done; but as his deed from the life-tenant was in form an exclusive and unlimited conveyance, it had been quite forgotten that the will of his grandfather limited it to a life estate.

    Bricks Without Straw

  • If, however, the eldest son consented to apostatize, the estate was settled upon him, the father from that hour became only a life-tenant, and lost all power of selling, mortgaging, or otherwise disposing of it.

    Handbook of Home Rule Being articles on the Irish question

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