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Examples

  • The only remedy for this kind of toughness is to peel away the lignified areas.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Bean pods, asparagus, and broccoli begin to use their sugar to make tough lignified fibers.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Called Giza 114, it has solid lignified stalks that burn at an especially high temperature for the stem of a grass.

    11. Sorghum: Fuel and Utility Types

  • The species propagates well asexually because lignified branches of any age possess a strong ability to form adventitious roots.

    Chapter 10

  • Strong, hard, and lignified (as in bamboo), they act like a wooden palisade across the hill slope.

    4 Questions and Answers

  • Inflorescences are cone-like with lignified scales, dark brown when ripened, and bearing more than 100 fruits per cone.

    Chapter 4

  • The first objective is to ensure healthy and resistant plants by good soil preparation and good drainage, the use of robust sticks taken from well-lignified stems, free from disease and undamaged, dipped in fungicide

    Chapter 11

  • L. edodes has potential for bioconversion of lignified residues and low-quality wood into fungal protein.

    Chapter 5

  • It should be considered as a means of converting wood processing residues and other lignified wastes into partially de-lignified products for feed or fibre use, or for further conversions (23).

    Chapter 5

  • Straw, like all mature plant tissue, is relatively indigestible by the micro-organisms that inhabit the digestive tract of ruminants, This is because straw cell walls are heavily lignified or silicified.

    Chapter 12

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