Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A system of pieces pivoted together, and turning about pivots attached to a fixed base, all the rotations being in the same plane or parallel planes, so that all the points describe definite curves; a complete linkwork.
  • n. Specifically In steam-engines, a system of gearing for controlling the valves for the purpose of starting or reversing the engine, and for controlling the cut-off. See valve-gear.
  • n. another set for backward motion;
  • n. two eccentric-rods or -blades from these two eccentrics to the top and bottom respectively of
  • n. the link or slot-link; and
  • n. the sliding-block in the slot of this link which carries the pin to which the valve-stem
  • n. is fitted, either directly or through a rocker-shaft and arms. When the link is lowered, the forward eccentric drives ; when the link is raised, the backward eccentric drives . In intermediate positions the block is actuated partly by both and , and, as these are in opposite phase or nearly so, the motion of becomes less, and the port is opened during a smaller portion of the piston-stroke, and an earlier cut-off results. Stephenson's is differentiated from other link-motions by having the link raised and lowered, and with it the eccentric-blades or -rods, to vary cut-off and reverse; hence, the slot-link has a curvature formed by an arc struck with the center of the engine-shaft as a center. The swing of the eccentric-straps and -blades around the eccentrics in the cutting-off and reversing adjustments of the link makes the lead of the valve increase, as the cut-off in forward gear is made earlier.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • This adjusted the "link-motion" mechanism, which is operated by the driving-axle, and cut off the steam entering the cylinders in such a way that it expanded more fully and economically, thus saving fuel without loss of power.

    Stories of Inventors The Adventures of Inventors and Engineers

  • It is reversed by means of the same mechanism used on locomotives -- the link-motion and reversing-lever, by which the direction of the steam is reversed and the engine made to run the other way.

    Stories of Inventors The Adventures of Inventors and Engineers

  • Thus the invention of the blast-pipe is claimed for Trevithick, George Stephenson, Goldsworthy Gurney, and Timothy H.ckworth; that of the tubular boiler by Seguin, Stevens, Booth, and W.H. James; that of the link-motion by John Gray, H.gh Williams, and Robert Stephenson.

    Industrial Biography

  • Stephenson, Goldsworthy Gurney, and Timothy H.ckworth; that of the tubular boiler by Seguin, Stevens, Booth, and W.H. James; that of the link-motion by John Gray, H.gh Williams, and Robert Stephenson.

    Industrial Biography, Iron Workers and Tool Makers

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