Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Full of lines; resembling a line; marked with lines.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • What was ittying on was that this starry ptitsa, very grey in the voloss and with a very liny like litso, was pouring the old moloko from a milk-bottle into saucers and then setting these saucers down on the floor, so you could tell there were plenty of mewing kots and koshkas writhing about down there.

    Where's the show?

  • What it was now was the starry 1939-45 War again, and it was a very blobby and liny and crackly film you could viddy had been made by the Germans.

    Where's the show?

  • He blushed a little, shook his head at her, and drove on ahead into the streets — the churches, the abbey, and other buildings on this clear bright morning having the liny distinctness of architectural drawings, as if the original dream and vision of the conceiving master-mason, some mediaeval Vilars or other unknown to fame, were for a few minutes flashed down through the centuries to an unappreciative age.

    The Woodlanders

  • American to really make a rather grand style out of what was actually rather liny and plain and, you know -- and came out of the New England limner tradition.

    American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America

  • The room was on the top floor and the liny dormer window seemed designed to keep out the summer breezes rather than to let them in.

    The Dirty Duck

  • The room was on the top floor and the liny dormer window seemed designed to keep out the summer breezes rather than to let them in.

    the dirty duck

  • He looked within his own body, saw the liny glowing golden sparks, realized they were multiplying rapidly.

    Starchild Omnibus

  • A liny round opening is left through which light can enter the eyeball, and this opening is the jmpil ( "doll" L, because of the tiny image of oneself one can see reflected there).

    The Human Brain

  • Her lips, I regret to say, were too liny, and not of the true ruby tint, but with the exception of her mouth all her features were, not to say more, good.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 15, No. 87, March, 1875

  • If we had in our power the pen which traced the delicate marvels of Queen Mab, not bigger than an agate that glitters on the finger of an alderman, of her liny chariot, of her diaphanous team, only then should we succeed in giving an idea of a purely ideal talent into which matter enters hardly at all.

    Frederic Chopin as a Man and Musician

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