Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Composed of dactyls and trochees so arranged as to produce a movement like that of ordinary speech.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Literally, prose-poetic; in ancient prosody, noting a variety of trochaic or iambic verse in which dactyls are combined with trochees or anapests with iambi: so called because this apparent irregularity seems to approach the non-observance of metrical laws characteristic of prose.
  • n. A verse of the character defined above.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Running Rhythm in having or being only one nominal rhythm, a mixed or 'logaoedic' one, instead of three, but on the other hand in having twice the flexibility of foot, so that any two stresses may either follow one another running or be divided by one, two, or three slack syllables.

    Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins Now First Published

  • And hence Sprung Rhythm differs from Running Rhythm in having or being only one nominal rhythm, a mixed or ‘logaoedicÂ’ one, instead of three, but on the other hand in having twice the flexibility of foot, so that any two stresses may either follow one another running or be divided by one, two, or three slack syllables.

    Author’s Preface

  • In Sprung Rhythm, as in logaoedic rhythm generally, the feet are assumed to be equally long or strong and their seeming inequality is made up by pause or stressing.

    Author’s Preface

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