Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of lour.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As her distance from the house grew, she stopped and looked up at the louring sky.

    An Atlas of Impossible Longing

  • As her distance from the house grew, she stopped and looked up at the louring sky.

    An Atlas of Impossible Longing

  • Unseal that louring eye from its repose; thy lowly couch of scattered leaves, O Hector, quit!

    Rhesus

  • As her distance from the house grew, she stopped and looked up at the louring sky.

    An Atlas of Impossible Longing

  • Unseal that louring eye from its repose; thy lowly couch of scattered leaves, O Hector, quit!

    Rhesus

  • I, for my part, never landed on Calais pier without feeling that a load of sorrows was left on the other side of the water; and have always fancied that black care stepped on board the steamer, along with the custom-house officers at Gravesend, and accompanied one to yonder black louring towers of London — so busy, so dismal, and so vast.

    The Paris Sketch Book

  • THE WEATHER WAS louring, clouds threatening anything from freezing rain to the first snow of the season, and occasional cold gusts of wind catching cloaks and skirts, bellying them out like sails.

    A Breath of Snow and Ashes

  • As it died in the distance, Macbriar brought his exercise to a conclusion, and his audience raised themselves from the stooping posture, and louring downward look, with which they had listened to it, and all fixed their eyes sternly on Henry Morton.

    Old Mortality

  • But her skin was sallow, and her person thin and meagre; A louring gloom over-spread her countenance; and it bore such visible marks of rancour and ill-will, as could not escape being noticed by the most inattentive Observer.

    The Monk

  • He saw Tragedy conspicuous in a grave solemnity of regard; Satire louring in a frown of envy and discontent; Elegy whining in a funeral aspect; Pastoral dozing in a most insipid languor of face; Ode-writing delineated in a distracted stare; and Epigram squinting with a pert sneer.

    The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle

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