Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of numerous plants of the genus Pedicularis, having clusters of irregular, variously colored flowers. Also called wood betony.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of very many semiparasitic flowering plants, of the genus Pedicularis, related to wood betony.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any species of Pedicularis, a genus of perennial herbs. It was said to make sheep that fed on it lousy.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A scrophulariaceous plant of the genus Pedicularis.
  • n. The stavesacre, Delphinium Staphisagria, the powdered seeds of which have been used from ancient times to destroy lice. Also louse-herb.

Etymologies

From the belief that sheep feeding on it were prone to lice.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
louse +‎ wort (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Even on the near side of winter there were treasures to be found, seeds clinging to dried flowerheads of fennel, dill, and anise, and lousewort with a few seedcases that had failed to split open.

    Wildfire

  • Are they so strong that they can be allowed to jeopardize the entire economy for the snail darter and the furbish lousewort?

    The Volokh Conspiracy » A 230 mpg Hybrid — and It’s a Chevrolet:

  • Arctic marsh willow Salix arctophila and flame-tipped lousewort Pedicularis flammea are frequent, Lapland buttercup Ranunculus lapponicus less frequent.

    Ilulissat Icefjord, Denmark-Greenland

  • Rare plants that occur or that have occurred here include heart leaf plantain, estuary beggar ticks, golden club, ovate spikerush, Parker's pipewort, Nuttall's micranthemum, Eaton's burmarigold, false pimpernel, winged monkey flower and swamp lousewort.

    Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve, New York

  • In one example, Coulter wrote: "The massive Dickey-Lincoln Dam, a $227 million hydroelectric project proposed on upper St. John River in Maine, was halted by the discovery of the Furbish lousewort, a plant previously believed to be extinct."

    June 2006

  • "Here's the Portland Press Herald, from the year 2000, in its list of the 'Maine Stories of the Century': 'The massive Dickey-Lincoln Dam, a $227 million hydroelectric project proposed on upper St. John River, is halted by the discovery of the Furbish lousewort, a plant believed to be extinct," offered The Rude Pundit.

    June 2006

  • Was the economy going to rack and ruin, for the sake of a few little fish, teetering on the brink of extinction, or a lousewort whatever that was, or some endangered worm?

    A History of American Law

  • Mariah: What are your feelings about holding up a multi-million-dollar project that could be used to serve economic and social interests to protect a fairly unknown species-say, the snail darter or the Furbish lousewort?

    Has Jesus Come and Gone?

  • River in Maine, was halted by the discovery of the Furbish lousewort, a plant previously believed to be extinct.

    Coulter accused of plagiarism, taking items out of context in another book

  • Here's the Portland Press Herald, from the year 2000, in its list of the 'Maine Stories of the Century': The massive Dickey-Lincoln Dam, a $227 million hydroelectric project proposed on upper St. John River, is halted by the discovery of the Furbish lousewort, a plant believed to be extinct.

    Archive 2006-07-01

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