Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Sometimes in the same poem we see him, now conforming to the manner of the traditional love-poet, now revivifying it or bursting through it with images and ideas that are wholly personal to himself.

    Personality in Literature

  • ‘Miss Cloud, do I understand you to say that Sidney was the greatest love-poet of the Elizabethan age?’

    Laurels are Poison

  • It was among the younger generation of Courtiers that Donne found the warmest admirers of his paradoxical and sensual audacities as a love-poet, as it was the divines who looked to Laud and the Court for Anglican doctrine and discipline who revered his memory, enshrined by the pious Izaak Walton, as of a divine poet and preacher.

    Introduction. Grierson, Herbert J.C

  • Nor is Clarinda’s love-poet, Sylvander, the real Burns either.

    The Study of Poetry

  • The study will probably teach us that Shakespeare was the most impassioned lover and love-poet in all literature.

    The Man Shakespeare

  • Shakespeare was the most impassioned lover and love-poet in all literature.

    The Man Shakespeare

  • This fact alone -- that our first great English poet was also our first English love-poet, properly so called -- would have sufficed to transform our poetic literature through his agency.

    Chaucer

  • "Si douce est la marguerite:" he has learnt the ways of French gallantry as if to the manner born, and thus becomes, as it were without hesitation or effort, the first English love-poet.

    Chaucer

  • "There is," says a Latin love-poet, "no why or wherefore in liking."

    What Will He Do with It? — Volume 03

  • Bacchus’s paramour; and Phanocles an amorous love-poet writes thus,

    Essays and Miscellanies

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.