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Etymologies

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Examples

  • ... run thorough the ear _with a love-song_. 'besides the passage from _Twelfth Nt. _ II, iii, quoted further on, where Feste offers Sir Toby and Sir Andrew their choice between 'a love-song, or a song of good life.'

    Shakespeare and Music With Illustrations from the Music of the 16th and 17th centuries

  • It was a French love-song that with great solemnity he sang into the brew.

    Lost Face

  • Performances range from the Beltway Poetry Slam poets to electronic-pop musicians/gallery darlings Bluebrain to a drive-in movie night held indoors; also on tap are classes, including ukulele basics and love-song writing with the Sweater Set and Tuvan throat gurgling with Seattle-based Arrington De Dioynso.

    February arts preview: Paul Gauguin, Jem Cohen, Blinky Palermo

  • What initially looked to be something of an oddity when first announced- a strange love-song to Eric Cantona from one of the pre-eminent British directors in the business- has to go down one as one of the best films to come out of our country in the past few years.

    A Triumph of British Cinema: Simon Goes LOOKING FOR ERIC in Cannes | Obsessed With Film

  • You almost hear the violins the the background of this love-song to the heretical Muslims.

    CONFIRMED

  • I don't know what is more Catholic: the love-song to Muslims of VII or Dante?

    CONFIRMED

  • Of course this diversity was most prominent on the Magnetic Fields '1999 compendium 69 Love Songs, for which he and the band ran through nearly every permutation of the love-song conceit, and came to rest on the lucky number.

    Magnetic Personality Disorder

  • I wanted to have that love-song approach that Paul McCartney brings to almost anything.

    A Melodic Tribute to 70s-Era Paul McCartney: Jim Windolf

  • I do so because their struggle for acceptance touches me like a love-song, one that provokes sincere discomfort and deep joy.

    Nick Mwaluko: Becoming a Man

  • And, surely, it did be as that the silence of the olden moonlit world did steal all about me; and sudden, I to know that the Maid did sing an olden love-song of the olden world, and to go halting a little as she sang, because that the words did steal something odd-wise through the far veils of her memory, even as a song doth come backward out of dreams.

    The Night Land

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