Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Obsolete spelling of loyal.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Wherein may be observed, what quarrels and contentions are occasioned by love; with some particular description, concerning the sincerity of a loyall friend

    The Decameron

  • Whereupon, they are joyned together in marriage, and their long loyall love mutually recompenced.

    The Decameron

  • But pardon me worthy Sir, my loyall and unfeigned love to your Daughter

    The Decameron

  • Now, this time and place being most convenient, I desire to bee resolved by you: Among all the men retained into your service; which of them do you thinke to be the best, most loyall, and worthiest to enjoy your love?

    The Decameron

  • And if they finde women wantonly disposed abroade, the like judgement they give of their Wives at home; as if they had never knowne their birth and breeding, or made proofe of their loyall carriage towards them.

    The Decameron

  • Office he lived long time after, as a loyall servant to the Church, and an honest thankefull friend to the Lord Abbot of Clugny.

    The Decameron

  • Jehannot well noting the honesty and loyall dealing of this Jew, began to have a Religious kinde of compassion in his soule, much pittying that a man so good in behaviour, so wise and discreete in all his actions, should be in danger of perdition thorow want of Faith.

    The Decameron

  • With patience Madam I endured all before, but now (me thinkes) he proceedeth too farre, which is not any way to be suffered; and therefore I intended to let you know it, that you may perceive, how wel you are rewarded for the faithfull and loyall love you beare him, and for which, I was even at deaths dore.

    The Decameron

  • Alas! how mighty, are the misfortunes of women, and how ill requited is all the loyall love of many wives to their husbands?

    The Decameron

  • When he, like a loyall and most honourable man, sharpely reprehended her fond and idle love: And when shee would have embraced him about the necke to have kissed him; he repulsed her roughly from him, protesting upon his honourable reputation, that rather then hee would so wrong his

    The Decameron

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