Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Great Britain, a part of an inn or public house where luncheon can be had. Compare lunch-counter.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • She was a woman of robust health, and having grown stout and elderly and red-faced, when out on the tramp and divested of externals she might very well have been taken for the eccentric landlady of a roadside inn or the mistress of a luncheon-bar; and probably her young footman did not think she answered to her own name at all.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 17, No. 097, January, 1876

  • He met James standing at the little luncheon-bar, like a pelican in the wilderness of the galleries, bent over a sandwich with a glass of sherry before him.

    Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works

  • It is only a luncheon-bar, and respectable enough. '

    The Nether World

  • Her engagement at the luncheon-bar he spoke of as a detestable slavery, which had wasted her health and driven her in the end to an act of desperation.

    The Nether World

  • He went to the luncheon-bar in Upper Street, and heard for the first time Mrs. Tubbs's rancorous surmises.

    The Nether World

  • Scawthorne was to have a cab waiting for her at a little distance from the luncheon-bar.

    The Nether World

  • The tent was divided into first and second-class compartments, and at the end of the first-class division was a yet further enclosure for the most exclusive, fenced off from the body of the tent by a luncheon-bar, behind which the host himself stood bustling about in white apron and shirt-sleeves, and looking as if he had never lived anywhere but under canvas all his life.

    Far from the Madding Crowd

  • The tent was divided into first and second-class compartments, and at the end of the first-class division was a yet further enclosure for the most exclusive, fenced of from the body of the tent by a luncheon-bar, behind which the host himself stood bustling about in white apron and shirt-sleeves, and looking as if he had never lived anywhere but under canvas all his life.

    Far from the Madding Crowd

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