Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Keen of vision.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Having acute sight.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Having acute sight.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Possessing particularly good vision.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective having very keen vision

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • She imagined this was the way it had worked with the fabled lynx-eyed librarians back at Alexandria.

    Rogue Oracle

  • She imagined this was the way it had worked with the fabled lynx-eyed librarians back at Alexandria.

    Rogue Oracle

  • "Not less 'n eight hundred in it," calculated the lynx-eyed Kink; and on the strength of it he took the first opportunity of a privy conversation with Bidwell, proprietor of the bad whisky and the tent.

    TOO MUCH GOLD

  • "Not less 'n eight hundred in it," calculated the lynx-eyed Kink; and on the strength of it he took the first opportunity of a privy conversation with Bidwell, proprietor of the bad whisky and the tent.

    Too Much Gold

  • But did I betray my desperate plight to those lynx-eyed guardians of the public welfare of Winnipeg?

    Confession

  • AUTUMN, SEASON OF MISTS AND MELLOW FRUITFULness, is upon the nation's capital, the frost is on the pumpkin and the vice president, lynx-eyed on behalf of the public weal, is laying siege to the citadel of our complacency by lecturing a covey of television weather forecasters to be on the lookout for global warming.

    The Popcorn Board Lives!

  • But, on the contrary, with lynx-eyed penetration he had seen through the sacred books of the Hebrews, the Babylonians, the Egyptians, the

    The Love of Books : The Philobiblon of Richard de Bury

  • Little lynx-eyed Dr. Von Finck, who attends most of the polite company at Baden, drove ceaselessly about the place that day, with the real version of the fainting-fit story, about which we may be sure the wicked and malicious, and the uninitiated, had a hundred absurd details.

    The Newcomes

  • There were billets on one side and the other; hints of a fatal destiny, and a ruthless, lynx-eyed tyrant, who held a demoniac grasp over the Duchess by means of certain secrets which he knew: there were regrets that we had not known each other sooner: why were we brought out of our convent and sacrificed to

    The Newcomes

  • However much my figure might have resembled that of the Pitan, and, disguised in his armor, might have deceived the lynx-eyed Mahrattas, into whose camp I was about to plunge, it was evident that a single glance at my fair face and auburn beard would have undeceived the dullest blockhead in

    Burlesques

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