Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun geology The largest earthquake in a sequence. Sometimes preceded by foreshocks and almost always followed by aftershocks which are of lesser intensity.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • A typical large earthquake will include a mainshock, the largest earthquake in a sequence, and may be preceded by smaller earthquakes known as foreshocks and followed by smaller earthquakes called aftershocks.

    Yellowstone Earthquake Swarms

  • Earthquake swarms are generally defined as clusters of earthquakes closely spaced in time and area that do not have a defined mainshock.

    Yellowstone Earthquake Swarms

  • Since the September 3, 2010 mainshock, there have been approximately 6 M

    The Guardian World News

  • Clusters of earthquakes happen in the Apennines all the time without leading to anything bigger, and the 3-day mainshock probabilities following the March 30th cluster were less than 1 percent, representing an increase, but still very low.

    NYT > Home Page

  • The 12 January mainshock and its aftershocks occurred on the Enriquillo Fault that runs east-west bordering the northern edge of the Caribbean tectonic plate.

    Naturejobs - All Jobs

  • A significant portion of these events is missing in existing earthquake catalogues, mainly because seismicity after the mainshock can be masked by overlapping arrivals of waves from the mainshock and aftershocks

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  • We find that the newly detected aftershocks migrate in both along-strike and down-dip directions with logarithmic time since the mainshock, consistent with numerical simulations of the expansion of aftershocks caused by propagating afterslip

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  • The largest aftershock is an 6.0 occurred 15 minutes after the mainshock You inspired me in 2009!

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  • Most of the aftershocks are on the NE part of the mainshock.

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  • They are smaller than the mainshock and … can continue over a period of weeks, months, or years. "

    NYT > Home Page

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