Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun nautical The topmast of the mainmast.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • From the deck to the truck of the maintopmast is something over a hundred feet, while the foremast with its topmast is eight or ten feet shorter.

    Chapter 6

  • From the deck to the truck of the maintopmast is something over a hundred feet, while the foremast with its topmast is eight or ten feet shorter.

    Chapter 6

  • In less than an hour I had the maintopmast on deck and was constructing the shears.

    Chapter 35

  • The maintopmast was over thirty feet in length, the foretopmast nearly thirty, and it was of these that

    Chapter 35

  • On deck all hell broke loose as they were striking the maintopmast half an hour later; the preventer top-rope reeved through the fid-hole parted at the very moment a deluge of warm rain beat down on the ship, so thick they could scarcely breathe, much less see.

    Heavy Weather

  • On deck all hell broke loose as they were striking the maintopmast half an hour later; the preventer top-rope reeved through the fid-hole parted at the very moment a deluge of warm rain beat down on the ship, so thick they could scarcely breathe, much less see.

    Archive 2006-12-01

  • Looking up in the darkness he could just make out that the brig was hove-to under the maintopmast staysail, of which only a corner was showing.

    Hornblower In The West Indies

  • After hearing guns on shore, and seeing rockets thrown up, the night remarkably dark, could just carry single reefed topsails, top-gallant sails, gib, and maintopmast staysails.

    The Life of the Right Honourable Horatio Lord Viscount Nelson, Volume 2

  • But to balance this success we had the misfortune to find that the Trial had sprung her mainmast, and that her maintopmast had come by the board; and as we were all of us standing to the eastward the next morning, with

    Anson's Voyage Round the World The Text Reduced

  • The _Frolic_, on the night of the 17th of October, had been overtaken by a most violent gale of wind, in which she carried away her mainyard, lost her topsails, and sprung her maintopmast.

    The Rise of Canada, from Barbarism to Wealth and Civilisation Volume 1

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