Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun misfortune

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • When Sir Tristram heard him say so he gat his spear in his hand, and either abashed down their heads, and came together as thunder; and Sir Tristram's spear brake in pieces, and Sir Launcelot by malfortune struck Sir Tristram on the side a deep wound nigh to the death; but yet Sir Tristram avoided not his saddle, and so the spear brake.

    Le Morte Darthur: Sir Thomas Malory's Book of King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table, Volume 1

  • She had preceded him into a prettily furnished dining-room, and the notion leaped up in his troubled mind that she was not so deeply moved by the malfortune of Monsieur Jean de Courtois as might be expected from the man's prospective bride.

    One Wonderful Night A Romance of New York

  • The 2009 Daytona 500 champ took advantage of Kyle Busch's flat tire malfortune late in Friday night's Nationwide Series race at Darlington Raceway to win and earlier in the day, the No. 17 scored its first pole since 2005 over Jeff Gordon.

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  • The 2009 Daytona 500 champ took advantage of Kyle Busch's flat tire malfortune late in Friday night's Nationwide Series race at Darlington Raceway to win and earlier in the day, the No. 17 scored its first pole since 2005 over Jeff Gordon.

    FanHouse

  • The 2009 Daytona 500 champ took advantage of Kyle Busch's flat tire malfortune late in Friday night's Nationwide Series race at Darlington Raceway to win and earlier in the day, the No. 17 scored its first pole since 2005 over Jeff Gordon.

    undefined

  • The 2009 Daytona 500 champ took advantage of Kyle Busch's flat tire malfortune late in Friday night's Nationwide Series race at Darlington Raceway to win and earlier in the day, the No. 17 scored its first pole since 2005 over Jeff Gordon.

    FanHouse

  • When Sir Tristram heard him say so he gat his spear in his hand, and either abashed down their heads, and came together as thunder; and Sir Tristram’s spear brake in pieces, and Sir Launcelot by malfortune struck Sir Tristram on the side a deep wound nigh to the death; but yet Sir Tristram avoided not his saddle, and so the spear brake.

    Le Morte d'Arthur: Sir Thomas Malory's book of King Arthur and of his noble knights of the Round table

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