manageableness love

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The state of being manageable; tractableness; docility.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun capable of being managed or controlled

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

manageable +‎ -ness

Examples

  • He felt dizzy, felt simultaneously small and huge, powerful and powerless, dwarfed and ennobled by the might and manageableness of things.

    THE WOUNDED SKY

  • He felt dizzy, felt simultaneously small and huge, powerful and powerless, dwarfed and ennobled by the might and manageableness of things.

    THE WOUNDED SKY

  • He felt dizzy, felt simultaneously small and huge, powerful and powerless, dwarfed and ennobled by the might and manageableness of things.

    THE WOUNDED SKY

  • He felt dizzy, felt simultaneously small and huge, powerful and powerless, dwarfed and ennobled by the might and manageableness of things.

    THE WOUNDED SKY

  • Here, if nowhere else, her small size and manageableness were in her favour.

    The Ontario Readers: Fourth Book

  • The advantage of Professor Tait's apparatus is its manageableness and the certainty with which the desired result can be produced.

    A History of Science: in Five Volumes. Volume III: Modern development of the physical sciences

  • The only requisite is manageableness of the ship herself and of the numbers she carries on board.

    Notes on Life and Letters

  • It is of them that I would talk a little, for my own comfort partly, and also because I am sticking all the time to my subject to illustrate my point, the point of manageableness which I have raised just now.

    Notes on Life and Letters

  • On the other side, but equally healthful, may be put the fact that the style and structure of the originals and earlier versions, and especially that verse division which has been now so unwisely abandoned, served as safeguards against the besetting sin of all prose writers of their time, the habit of indulging in long wandering sentences, in paragraphs destitute of proportion and of grace, destitute even of ordinary manageableness and shape.

    A History of Elizabethan Literature

  • They were, like the others, much impressed by its vast power and manageableness.

    James Nasmyth: Engineer, An Autobiography.

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