Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • An obsolete form of mannerly.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • ¶ Playe not Iacke maleperte, _tha_t ys to say, be ware of presumpc_i_on, be ware of pryde; 492 take not _th_e first place, my child, by _th_e waye; till [e] oder be sette, ryght manerly a-byde, presumtvous be ofte sette a-syde

    Caxton's Book of Curtesye

  • Or i_n_ the prees right manerly to davnce. wha_n_ me_n_ se a child of suche governavnce,

    Caxton's Book of Curtesye

  • ¶ Eschewe also tacches of fowle ravayne, of gredy luste; w_i_t_h_ vncurteys appetyte 177 prece not to sone; fro yo_u_r vyande restrayn_e_ yo_u_r hand a while w_i_t_h_ manerly respyte; ffede you for necessyte, & not for delyte.

    Caxton's Book of Curtesye

  • He is brought into the temple, he lerneth to bowe his kne, to holde hys handes manerly, to put of hys cap, and to fashion all the behaueour of hys bodie to worshyp God, he is cõmaunded to holde hys peace when misteries be in doyng, and to turne hys eyes to the alter.

    The Education of Children

  • A lewd terme to be giuen to a Princes treasure (_pelfe_) and was a little more manerly spoken by _Seriant Bendlowes_, when in a progresse time comming to salute the Queene in Huntingtonshire he said to her Cochman, stay thy cart good fellow, stay thy cart, that I may speake to the Queene, whereat her Maiestie laughed as she had bene tickled, and all the rest of the company although very graciously (as her manner is) she gaue him great thanks and her hand to kisse.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • Cover þy cuppeborde of thy ewery w {i} t {h} the towell {e} of diapery; take a towell {e} abowt thy nekke/for þat is curtesy, lay þ {a} t ooñ side of þe towaile oñ þy lift arme manerly, an oñ þe same arme ley þy sou {er} aignes napkyñ honestly; 196

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • _th_e gyse of the_m_ _tha_t do most manerly; but be ware of onthryft [1] ruskyn gallavnte,

    Caxton's Book of Curtesye

  • A lewd terme to be giuen to a Princes treasure (pelfe) and was a little more manerly spoken by Seriant Bendlowes, when in a progresse time comming to salute the Queene in Huntingtonshire he said to her cochman, stay thy cart good fellow, stay thy cart, that I may speake to the Queene, whereat her Maiestie laughed as she had bene tickled, and all the rest of the company although very graciously (as her manner is) she gaue him great shankes and her hand to kisse.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • This maistyr sittith in the halle, next unto these Henxmen, at the same boarde, to have his respecte unto theyre demeanynges, howe manerly they ete and drinke, and to theyre communication and other formes curiall, after _the booke of urbanitie_.”

    Early English Meals and Manners

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