Definitions

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  • noun Plural form of mannerist.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A return to either the master from Vienna himself or the mannerists who followed after him will paralyze the effort.

    Diagnosis: Diffident

  • So dumping on the mannerists as somehow just too bourgeois just strikes me as silly--typical ideological puritanism, bad for the brain in art and everything else.

    I refuse to say anything profound

  • They are, to the full, as much mannerists, too, as the poetasters who ring changes on the common-places of magazine versification; and all the difference between them is, that they borrow their phrases from a different and a scantier _gradus ad Parnassum_.

    Early Reviews of English Poets

  • Gainsborough, but his manner (and both were mannerists) was scratchy and thin, while that of Reynolds was manly and rich.

    The Mind of the Artist Thoughts and Sayings of Painters and Sculptors on Their Art

  • Nothing but a close and continual observance of nature can protect them from the danger of becoming mannerists.

    The Mind of the Artist Thoughts and Sayings of Painters and Sculptors on Their Art

  • There are, indeed, mannerists enough; and we mean not here to use the word in its reprehensive sense but they stand more alone.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 54, No. 334, August 1843

  • At the time of his arrival at Rome the school was divided into two parties, that of the mannerists who followed Guido, and that of the brutal naturalists who followed Caravaggio, both in Poussin's opinion quackery, equally dishonest and remote from reality.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • But diction is only part of expression, and, as I have just hinted, it would seem as if, before his lesson in pure style was fully learned, he had passed under the fascination of the mannerists, and particularly of Pope.

    Platform Monologues

  • They are to the full as much mannerists, too, as the poetasters who ring changes on the commonplaces of magazine versification; and all the difference between them is that they borrow their phrases from a different and a scantier _gradus ad Parnassum_.

    Famous Reviews

  • The Pope in Rome, and Lorenzo in Florence, led art to the verge of paganism; Savonarola would have kept it on the confines of purism; it was divided and fell, passing through the various steps of decadence, the mannerists and the eclectics, to rise again in this nineteenth century with what is after all its true aim, the interpretation of nature, and the illustration of the poetry of a nation.

    Fra Bartolommeo

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