Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of mansard.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They could look over the treetops to the buildings on Fifth Avenue, the unbroken taupe facade, and then to the mansards and temple-tops at the western edge of the park, and Klara imagined the whistling doormen, the taxis hotfooting past—she loved the showy yellow coats of New York cabs.

    Underworld

  • They could look over the treetops to the buildings on Fifth Avenue, the unbroken taupe facade, and then to the mansards and temple-tops at the western edge of the park, and Klara imagined the whistling doormen, the taxis hotfooting past—she loved the showy yellow coats of New York cabs.

    Underworld

  • They could look over the treetops to the buildings on Fifth Avenue, the unbroken taupe facade, and then to the mansards and temple-tops at the western edge of the park, and Klara imagined the whistling doormen, the taxis hotfooting past—she loved the showy yellow coats of New York cabs.

    Underworld

  • On the side facing the street it's much more normal, except I slipped a few mansards down, so that coming on the point, these housing units made a gesture to the corner.

    Frank Gehry as a young rebel

  • On the side facing the street it's much more normal, except I slipped a few mansards down, so that coming on the point, these housing units made a gesture to the corner.

    Frank Gehry as a young rebel

  • On the side facing the street it's much more normal, except I slipped a few mansards down, so that coming on the point, these housing units made a gesture to the corner.

    Frank Gehry as a young rebel

  • Above the Gerards, in one of the mansards upon the sixth floor, lived a printer named Combarieu, with his wife or mistress -- the concierge did not know which, nor did it matter much.

    The French Immortals Series — Complete

  • Bohémienne_ in lofty mansards of _maisons meublées_, dining at cheap restaurants, breakfasting by aid of spirit-lamps from corners of dressing-tables and lunching on _charcuterie_ in the anteroom of the

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 22. July, 1878.

  • And a half, because there are such five, six, and seven-story profitable houses, packed to overflowing and cheap, on top of which are erected still other sorry bug-breeders of roof iron, something in the nature of mansards; or more exactly, bird - houses, in which it is fearfully cold in winter, while in the summer time it is just as torrid as in the tropics.

    Yama: the pit

  • For instance, in a law suit which took place at Paris in the month of November, 1886, between M. Popp, constructor of pneumatic city clocks, and financiers who had been backing him, certain engineers and chemists of the School of M.nes declared that gold could be extracted from common silex, so that the very walls sheltering us might be placers, and the mansards might be loaded with nuggets!

    Là-bas

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