Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Cultivation.
  • noun Application of manure; manuring.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete Cultivation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun obsolete cultivation

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They never eat of anything that is set or sown; and as at home they use neither planting nor other manurance, so when they come abroad they refuse to feed of aught but of that which nature without labour bringeth forth.

    The Discovery of Guiana. Paras. 1-49

  • To conclude, Guiana is a country that hath yet her maidenhead, never sacked, turned, nor wrought; the face of the earth hath not been torn, nor the virtue and salt of the soil spent by manurance.

    The Discovery of Guiana. Paras. 50-102

  • To conclude, Guiana is a country that hath yet her maidenhead, never sacked, turned, nor wrought; the face of the earth hath not been torn, nor the virtue and salt of the soil spent by manurance.

    The Discovery of Guiana

  • They never eat of anything that is set or sown; and as at home they use neither planting nor other manurance, so when they come abroad they refuse to feed of aught but of that which nature without labour bringeth forth.

    The Discovery of Guiana

  • For as the wronging or cherishing of seeds or young plants is that that is most important to their thriving, and as it was noted that the first six kings being in truth as tutors of the state of Rome in the infancy thereof was the principal cause of the immense greatness of that state which followed, so the culture and manurance of minds in youth hath such a forcible (though unseen) operation, as hardly any length of time or contention of labour can countervail it afterwards.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • For as the wronging or cherishing of seeds or young plants is that that is most important to their thriving, and as it was noted that the first six kings being in truth as tutors of the state of Rome in the infancy thereof was the principal cause of the immense greatness of that state which followed, so the culture and manurance of minds in youth hath such a forcible (though unseen) operation, as hardly any length of time or contention of labour can countervail it afterwards.

    The Advancement of Learning

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