Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Cosmetic or theatrical makeup.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French, from maquiller, to apply makeup, from Old French macquiller, to work, from Old North French maquier, from Middle Dutch maken, to make; see mag- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French maquillage.

Examples

  • Eye makeup was almost unknown, other than kohl, India ink, and 'maquillage': a form of mascara made from heavy gum, that had to be warmed over a spirit lamp and left tell-tale beads on the ends of the lashes.

    Everything2 New Writeups

  • So what do make and made, and mass and maquillage, tell us?

    The English Is Coming!

  • While Dutch is very closely related to English—both are daughters of West Germanic—maquillage in English is nonetheless deemed a “borrowed” term.

    The English Is Coming!

  • Dutch provides an instance of this, via French, with maquillage, for “makeup.”

    The English Is Coming!

  • So what do make and made, and mass and maquillage, tell us?

    The English Is Coming!

  • Dutch provides an instance of this, via French, with maquillage, for “makeup.”

    The English Is Coming!

  • While Dutch is very closely related to English—both are daughters of West Germanic—maquillage in English is nonetheless deemed a “borrowed” term.

    The English Is Coming!

  • In the place of maquillage she wore a healthy, natural glow.

    Kindness of strangers

  • In the place of maquillage she wore a healthy, natural glow.

    Escapade

  • That's just another way of saying that as lazy as I am, I have finally recognized the need for a teensy bit of maquillage here and there.

    Coolhunter: Shiseido's Makeup Simulator

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