Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of marchioness.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Orthodox art history tends to see Effie as a malign influence, eagerly propelling her docile husband down the path to mass acceptance, marchionesses' daughters and giving the public what it wanted—a long, craven process of "selling out" symbolized by the baronetcy that came his way in 1885.

    A Far From Model Marriage

  • Orthodox art history tends to see Effie as a malign influence, eagerly propelling her docile husband down the path to mass acceptance, marchionesses' daughters and giving the public what it wanted—a long, craven process of "selling out" symbolized by the baronetcy that came his way in 1885.

    A Far From Model Marriage

  • Modesty forbids that we should reveal the names of the heart-broken countesses and dear marchionesses who are pining for every one of the contributors in PUNCH.

    The Book of Snobs

  • Mrs. Mackenzie had quite a list of counts and marchionesses among her friends.

    The Newcomes

  • The little fellow was obliged to lug out his sword too, and went shuddering down stairs, heartily repenting of his passion for marchionesses.

    The Paris Sketch Book

  • Yvette hummed and looked at herself, and put on her most dégagé airs of one of the young marchionesses.

    The Virgin and the Gypsy

  • He is introduced into the salons of his superior officer, Count Chamaral, but meets with no sort of success among the marchionesses and duchesses.

    The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 3, February, 1851

  • Only fancy the great, snuffy, wheezing Doctor, with his hair-powder whitening half his shoulders, led up before some charming little extravaganza of Boucher, wherein all the nymphs are simpering marchionesses, with rosettes on their high-heeled slippers that out-color the sky!

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 77, March, 1864

  • "I hear you are acquainted with some of the nobility, marchionesses and so forth," said Champney; the two were sitting in the shadow of the boat house cleaning their fingers with the lard Hannah had provided.

    Flamsted quarries

  • Parsons, marchionesses, and maiden aunts received simultaneous enlightenment as to Christian truth, and discovered that slavery was not prohibited, but was even countenanced, in the Bible.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 100, February, 1866

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.