Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Alternative spelling of mark to model.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In this case, it is not a mark-to-market, it is a mark-to-model or to assumptions that may or may not be reflective of what Orchard would be worth in a market transaction, were it for sale.

    Sears Chairman Unleashes 15-Page Manifesto About Um, Everything - The Consumerist

  • After the Financial Accounting Standards Board eased so-called mark-to-market accounting rules on April 2, the banks could consult their own esoteric models and essentially value their bad assets however they wanted, “mark-to-model.”

    THE PROMISE

  • After the Financial Accounting Standards Board eased so-called mark-to-market accounting rules on April 2, the banks could consult their own esoteric models and essentially value their bad assets however they wanted, “mark-to-model.”

    THE PROMISE

  • After the Financial Accounting Standards Board eased so-called mark-to-market accounting rules on April 2, the banks could consult their own esoteric models and essentially value their bad assets however they wanted, “mark-to-model.”

    THE PROMISE

  • "In this era of mark-to-model or mark-to-make-believe, until I can see what's on the other guy's books I'm not going to trust him," said Julian Mann, portfolio manager at First Pacific Advisors.

    Counterparty Risk Gets Takers

  • Accounting based on a mark-to-model has been severely tested by unobservable inputs intended to estimate the market.

    Toward a Transparent Financial System

  • In these days of mortgage troubles, the phrase mark-to-model usually causes shivers on Wall Street.

    Score a Point for Diller

  • These "mark-to-model" valuations have proven to be fantasies -- or at least wishful thinking -- when compared with the price at which anyone will actually buy the stuff.

    Implausible Deniability?

  • On the assumption that management knows its customers better than anyone, and that banks typically intend on holding loans forever, banks are allowed to value assets with a combination of mark-to-model (a value based on management's assumptions) and amortized cost, which is basically the full value at which the loans were made, less loss reserves.

    Fool.com: The Motley Fool

  • They forced the FASB to accept a rule-change in the accounting methodology called "mark-to-model" which let banks decide how much their assets were worth, rather than letting the markets decide.

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