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Etymologies

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Examples

  • That she had been bewildered when questioned by the market-woman, was not surprising, since she had passed a sleepless night, and the fate of poor William was yet uncertain.

    Chapter 7

  • That she had been bewildered when questioned by the market-woman was not surprising, since she had passed

    Chapter 8

  • But suppose the market-woman should hide her fat goose when Sir

    The Virginians

  • Readers cannot fail to have remarked that what an author tells us of the beauty or the charm of his creatures goes for nought; that we know instantly better; that the heroine cannot open her mouth but what, all in a moment, the fine phrases of preparation fall from round her like the robes from Cinderella, and she stands before us, self-betrayed, as a poor, ugly, sickly wench, or perhaps a strapping market-woman.

    Memories and Portraits

  • That would not be fair-play: every woman was young in her turn, and had her chances of matrimony, which it was a point of honour for other women not to spoil — just as one market-woman who has sold her own eggs must not try to balk another of a customer.

    Adam Bede

  • She had been out the whole of the night on which the murder had been committed, and towards morning had been perceived by a market-woman not far from the spot where the body of the murdered child had been afterwards found.

    Frankenstein; Or, The Modern Prometheus

  • That she had been bewildered when questioned by the market-woman, was not surprising since she had passed a sleepless night, and the fate of poor William was yet uncertain.

    Frankenstein; Or, The Modern Prometheus

  • That she had been bewildered when questioned by the market-woman was not surprising, since she had passed a sleepless night and the fate of poor William was yet uncertain.

    Frankenstein

  • She had been out the whole of the night on which the murder had been committed and towards morning had been perceived by a market-woman not far from the spot where the body of the murdered child had been afterwards found.

    Frankenstein

  • The hall was in consequence besieged by an immense mob from Cambridge, fired, and nearly destroyed; Mary and her host with difficulty escaped, (she disguised as a market-woman,) and as queen, she rebuilt Sawston with the stones of Cambridge Castle.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 13, No. 370, May 16, 1829

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