Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A bitter herb, eaten at the seder meal on the first two evenings of Passover.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In the first of three pieces on Ha Lachma Anya, Rabbi Yitz Greenberg explores how matzah and maror remind us not to overlook what God intended to be our sacred mission in this world and not to become too complacent in our current celebratory well-being to forget the stranger, the poor and the orphan.

    Ari Hart: Food Justice At Your Seder Table

  • The play takes place in Los Angeles, as a group of old friends and new gather to celebrate a Passover Seder, and opposing viewpoints are sandwiched together like charoset and maror.

    Tracy Shaffer: Denver: Center of the New Play Universe

  • The play takes place in Los Angeles, as a group of old friends and new gather to celebrate a Passover Seder, and opposing viewpoints are sandwiched together like charoset and maror.

    Tracy Shaffer: Denver: Center of the New Play Universe

  • We lift high the matzah, the bread of affliction, for all to see; we taste the painful maror to remind us of embittered lives and oppressive work; we drink four cups of redemptive wine.

    Ari Hart: Food Justice At Your Seder Table

  • The play takes place in Los Angeles, as a group of old friends and new gather to celebrate a Passover Seder, and opposing viewpoints are sandwiched together like charoset and maror.

    Tracy Shaffer: Denver: Center of the New Play Universe

  • The play takes place in Los Angeles, as a group of old friends and new gather to celebrate a Passover Seder, and opposing viewpoints are sandwiched together like charoset and maror.

    Tracy Shaffer: Denver: Center of the New Play Universe

  • Because the woman is obligated in the Passover sacrifice and eating mazzah, she is also obligated in eating bitter herbs (maror).

    Legal-Religious Status of the Jewish Female.

  • Our maror is horseradish root and symbolizes the bitterness of slavery and anything to do with getting used and abused by "The Man."

    Alec Sokolow: The Audacity to Haggadah

  • Placed on the plate are a roasted egg to signify rebirth in spring, karpas (parsley) to signify the springtime, a roasted lamb shank to signify the paschal sacrifice that Jews used to offer in the ancient Temple, maror (a bitter herb, such as horseradish) to signify the bitterness of slavery, and Chazeret, a second bitter herb to represent the bitterness.

    Happy Passover פֶּסַח

  • Our maror is horseradish root and symbolizes the bitterness of slavery and anything to do with getting used and abused by "Da Man."

    Alec Sokolow: Haggadah Get Out Of This Place

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