Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of martyrium.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • The first is somewhat of a fantasy in the manner of Wagner and Plečnik (officially the most unjustly underrated architect of the twentieth century), drawing on the long tradition of centralized church-planning that is associated wih shrines and martyria, while the second design, with accompanying plan, is a bit more realistic and worth pausing over.

    A Counter-Proposal for a Shrine on the West Coast

  • Christian mission means that the appointed messengers witness to and proclaim the historical realization of the universal salvific will of God in Jesus Christ and celebrate the sacramental presence of that realization in the martyria, leiturgia and diakonia of the Church of Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

    Confessing the Messiah: The Church's Confession of Christ in Jewish-Christian Dialogue - Bishop Müller's Statement Pt. III

  • But there seems no denying that new forms of social memory evolved, invested in new monuments (such as churches or martyria) or in new ways of dividing up the world (such as the distribution of bishoprics).

    Jews and Christians in a Roman World

  • The devotion of the faithful, especially towards relics, led to the erection of numerous secondary chapels, oratoria, basilicæ, martyria, which also had their clergy.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

  • After the middle of the fourth century we find confessor used to designate those men of remarkable virtue and knowledge who confessed the Faith of Christ before the world by the practice of the most heroic virtue, by their writings and preachings, and in consequence began to be objects of veneration, had chapels (martyria) erected in their honour, which in the previous centuries had been the especial privilege of the martyrs.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

  • But the martyria alone did not attract the crowds; it became the custom to go to the celebrated basilicas, and sometimes all the clergy of a large city assembled at a certain point, probably in the vicinity of the episcopal residence, to go thence with the bishop, the patriarch, or the pope himself to the place assigned for the celebration of the Eucharist.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • These were called oratoria, basilicae, martyria, or tituli minores, and were in no respect parish churches, because in them baptism could not be administered; moreover, on certain solemn days, the faithful were obliged to assist at Mass in the parish church.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 3: Brownson-Clairvaux

  • Flavian, mentioning priests attached to martyria or suburban churches at Constantinople, and the sixth canon forbade the ordination of any save to some title, these martyria being in the list of those recognized.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 3: Brownson-Clairvaux

  • Severum persecutionem concitasse refert, in qua per omnes ubique locorum Ecclesias, ab athletis pro pietate certantibus, illustria confecta fuerunt martyria.

    History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire — Volume 2

  • Severum persecutionem concitasse refert, in qua per omnes ubique locorum Ecclesias, ab athletis pro pietate certantibus, illustria confecta fuerunt martyria.

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

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