Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The missal, or Roman Catholic service-book.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There is a good library kept in it, in which are some manuscripts, and particularly an old missal or mass-book, the leaves of vellum, and famous for its most exquisite writing.

    From London to Land's End

  • I was wrong about the torn mass-book, too; there's no harm in that.

    The Father Brown Omnibus

  • There is a good library kept in it, in which are some manuscripts, and particularly an old missal or mass-book, the leaves of vellum, and famous for its most exquisite writing.

    From London to Land's End

  • There is a good library kept in it, in which are some manuscripts, and particularly an old missal or mass-book, the leaves of vellum, and famous for its most exquisite writing.

    From London to Land's End

  • Go to the mass-book and the rubric of it; -- you will see how many instructions and directions they give priests about the way of going into their sanctum and to their altars; -- how they must bow and bend themselves, sometimes one way sometimes another; sometimes kneel, sometimes stand; sometimes go backwards, sometimes forward.

    The Sermons of John Owen

  • Nor have I observed that any public liturgies (the mass-book only excepted, wherein there is a frequent recourse unto the merits and intercession of saints) do guide men in their prayers before God to plead any thing for their acceptance with him, or as the means or condition thereof, but grace, mercy, — the righteousness and blood of Christ alone.

    The Doctrine of Justification by Faith

  • Roman Catholic mass-book and ritual, corresponded exactly with what I was doing.

    Secret Enemies of True Republicanism

  • Parliament, and the earl told money out upon the mass-book for her dower.

    Young Folks Treasury, Volume 2 (of 12)

  • She turned D. Joaõ into a _padre_, the horse into a bell, the saddle into an altar and the musket into a mass-book.

    Tales of Giants from Brazil

  • The combatants had each to swear on the mass-book that they were thus armed, and that they had no stone of virtue nor herb of virtue nor charm nor any other enchantment.

    The Customs of Old England

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