Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of mastership.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The 64-year-old Feinberg has an impressive résumé of special masterships, resolving payments for Agent Orange, asbestos and the Virginia Tech shooting, among others.

    Ken Feinberg, czar of the gulf

  • They selected their own officers, who disposed of masterships, delivered patents, collected fees, visited the workshops, and imposed necessary fines.

    The Social Order Before and After the Protestant Reformation

  • If any poor creature go to the stoves to illuminate his muzzle with a cowsherd or to buy winter-boots, and that the sergeants passing by, or those of the watch, happen to receive the decoction of a clyster or the fecal matter of a close-stool upon their rustling-wrangling-clutter-keeping masterships, should any because of that make bold to clip the shillings and testers and fry the wooden dishes?

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • If any poor creature go to the stoves to illuminate his muzzle with a cowsherd or to buy winter-boots, and that the sergeants passing by, or those of the watch, happen to receive the decoction of a clyster or the fecal matter of a close-stool upon their rustling-wrangling-clutter-keeping masterships, should any because of that make bold to clip the shillings and testers and fry the wooden dishes?

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • Three times between 1673 and 1707 the central government arbitrarily put up for sale new masterships in the guild; the established masters had either to accept the loss of their monopoly, to purchase the new masterships, or to buy the government off with the payment of a lump sum.

    Savoring The Past

  • Eluard of Winchester was a black canon of considerable learning and several masterships, some from French schools.

    The Devil's Novice

  • By limiting the number of masterships, the guild statutes assured a monopoly to those who held them.

    Savoring The Past

  • Eluard of Winchester was a black canon of considerable learning and several masterships, some from French schools.

    The Devil's Novice

  • Three times between 1673 and 1707 the central government arbitrarily put up for sale new masterships in the guild; the established masters had either to accept the loss of their monopoly, to purchase the new masterships, or to buy the government off with the payment of a lump sum.

    Savoring The Past

  • By limiting the number of masterships, the guild statutes assured a monopoly to those who held them.

    Savoring The Past

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