mathematicians love

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of mathematician.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Mathematicians are known for their solitary work style, but the assault on E8 is part of a large project bringing together 18 mathematicians from the U.S. and Europe for an intensive four-year collaboration. andThe magnitude of the E8 calculation invites comparison with the Human Genome Project.

    Archive 2007-06-01

  • What would amaze past mathematicians is not just the number of conferences but that they exist at all.

    Homeland Insecurity

  • If mathematicians from the 1970s were suddenly transported through time to the present, they would be happily surprised by developments such as the proofs to Kepler's conjecture (proposed in 1611, confirmed in 1998) and to Fermat's last theorem (1637, 1994).

    Homeland Insecurity

  • What would amaze past mathematicians is not just the number of conferences but that they exist at all.

    Homeland Insecurity

  • What would amaze past mathematicians is not just the number of conferences but that they exist at all.

    Homeland Insecurity

  • What would amaze past mathematicians is not just the number of conferences but that they exist at all.

    Homeland Insecurity

  • If mathematicians from the 1970s were suddenly transported through time to the present, they would be happily surprised by developments such as the proofs to Kepler's conjecture (proposed in 1611, confirmed in 1998) and to Fermat's last theorem (1637, 1994).

    Homeland Insecurity

  • What would amaze past mathematicians is not just the number of conferences but that they exist at all.

    Homeland Insecurity

  • If mathematicians from the 1970s were suddenly transported through time to the present, they would be happily surprised by developments such as the proofs to Kepler's conjecture (proposed in 1611, confirmed in 1998) and to Fermat's last theorem (1637, 1994).

    Homeland Insecurity

  • If mathematicians from the 1970s were suddenly transported through time to the present, they would be happily surprised by developments such as the proofs to Kepler's conjecture (proposed in 1611, confirmed in 1998) and to Fermat's last theorem (1637, 1994).

    Homeland Insecurity

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.