Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of mazer.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Lambs roasted whole, and game and poultry dressed in pilaus, were piled in vessels of gold, and silver, and porcelain, and intermixed with large mazers of sherbet, cooled in snow and ice from the caverns of Mount Lebanon.

    The Talisman

  • Then, in great wooden cups and bowls and mazers, wreathed with ivy, came the wines; dark, thick ones like syrups of mulberry juice, and clear red ones like red jellies liquefied, and yellow wines and green wines and yellow-green and greenish-yellow.

    Prince Caspian

  • Lambs roasted whole, and game and poultry dressed in pilaus, were piled in vessels of gold, and silver, and porcelain, and intermixed with large mazers of sherbet, cooled in snow and ice from the caverns of Mount Lebanon.

    The Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886

  • They took away also the pots of brass, and the mazers, and the forks, and the cups, and the mortars, and all the vessels of brass, with which they ministered.

    The Bible, Douay-Rheims, Complete

  • They took away also the pots of brass, and the mazers, and the forks, and the cups, and the mortars, and all the vessels of brass, with which they ministered.

    The Bible, Douay-Rheims, Complete The Challoner Revision

  • They took away also the pots of brass, and the mazers, and the forks, and the cups, and the mortars, and all the vessels of brass, with which they ministered.

    The Bible, Douay-Rheims, Book 12: 4 Kings The Challoner Revision

  • Lambs roasted whole, and game and poultry dressed in pilaus, were piled in vessels of gold, and silver, and porcelain, and intermixed with large mazers of sherbet cooled in snow and ice from the caverns of Mount Lebanon.

    The Talisman

  • Thereat they all laughed and fell to their victual, which was abundant, of wood-venison and mountain-fowl, but of bread was no great plenty; wine lacked not, and that of the best; and Gold-mane noted that the cups and the apparel of the horns and mazers were not of gold nor gilded copper, but of silver; and he marvelled thereat, for in the Dale silver was rare.

    The Roots of the Mountains; Wherein Is Told Somewhat of the Lives of the Men of Burgdale

  • There was bread and flesh (though not Gold-mane's venison), and leeks and roasted chestnuts of the grove, and red-cheeked apples of the garth, and honey enough of that year's gathering, and medlars sharp and mellow: moreover, good wine of the western bents went up and down the hall in great gilded copper bowls and in mazers girt and lipped with gold.

    The Roots of the Mountains; Wherein Is Told Somewhat of the Lives of the Men of Burgdale

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