Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun historical the seat or bench at a Germanic feast

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Translating Old English medusetl.

Examples

  • Oft Scyld the Scefing from squadroned foes, from many a tribe, the mead-bench tore, awing the earls.

    Poetry Friday

  • Oft Scyld the Scefing from squadroned foes, from many a tribe, the mead-bench tore, awing the earls.

    Archive 2006-06-01

  • A sword to the boat-guard Beowulf gave, mounted with gold; on the mead-bench since he was better esteemed, that blade possessing, heirloom old. —

    Beowulf, translated by Francis Gummere

  • A sword to the boat-guard Beowulf gave, mounted with gold; on the mead-bench since he was better esteemed, that blade possessing, heirloom old. —

    Beowulf, translated by Francis Gummere

  • Wonder it was the wine-hall firm in the strain of their struggle stood, to earth the fair house fell not; too fast it was within and without by its iron bands craftily clamped; though there crashed from sill many a mead-bench — men have told me — gay with gold, where the grim foes wrestled.

    Beowulf, translated by Francis Gummere

  • Wonder it was the wine-hall firm in the strain of their struggle stood, to earth the fair house fell not; too fast it was within and without by its iron bands craftily clamped; though there crashed from sill many a mead-bench — men have told me — gay with gold, where the grim foes wrestled.

    Beowulf

  • Wonder it was the wine-hall firm in the strain of their struggle stood, to earth the fair house fell not; too fast it was within and without by its iron bands craftily clamped; though there crashed from sill many a mead-bench — men have told me — gay with gold, where the grim foes wrestled.

    Beowulf, translated by Francis Gummere

  • A sword to the boat-guard Beowulf gave, mounted with gold; on the mead-bench since he was better esteemed, that blade possessing, heirloom old. —

    Beowulf

  • Oft Scyld the Scefing from squadroned foes, from many a tribe, the mead-bench tore, awing the earls.

    Beowulf, translated by Francis Gummere

  • Oft Scyld the Scefing from squadroned foes, from many a tribe, the mead-bench tore, awing the earls.

    Beowulf

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