Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective superlative form of meager: most meager.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • She would accept no more than the meagerest allowance, and went down into the Latin Quarter on her own, batching with two other American girls.

    CHAPTER XVIII

  • Today's monks and hermits were inspired by St. Anthony, the third-century Egyptian who went into the desert and, legend has it, shut himself in a cave, allowing himself no company and only the meagerest amounts of bread and water for 20 years.

    Open Seas

  • Of his life in Paris there are only the meagerest reports, and he records no observations upon political affairs.

    Washington Irving

  • Ewell's instructions from Jackson were of the meagerest: He was to watch Banks and, presumably, was authorized to assail an exposed force if he could do so without great risks; but how was Ewell to determine the risks?

    LEE’S LIEUTENANTS

  • Ewell's instructions from Jackson were of the meagerest: He was to watch Banks and, presumably, was authorized to assail an exposed force if he could do so without great risks; but how was Ewell to determine the risks?

    LEE’S LIEUTENANTS

  • His meagerest efforts to move were enough to spin him wildly, and several moments passed before he coordinated himself to move in one direction.

    In Other Worlds

  • The platform swooped through the forest, darting in and out among the trees and missing some of them by the meagerest of margins.

    Trek to Madworld

  • The troops were barely able to keep alive on the meagerest of rations; recruiting had to be pronounced as worse than slow; the enemy was close to victory in Carolina and suspiciously astir in New York; financial ruin apparently hung on the response of the States to the plan for calling in the old, discredited currency; the Army remained too weak for an offensive.

    Washington

  • The troops were barely able to keep alive on the meagerest of rations; recruiting had to be pronounced as worse than slow; the enemy was close to victory in Carolina and suspiciously astir in New York; financial ruin apparently hung on the response of the States to the plan for calling in the old, discredited currency; the Army remained too weak for an offensive.

    Washington

  • The troops were barely able to keep alive on the meagerest of rations; recruiting had to be pronounced as worse than slow; the enemy was close to victory in Carolina and suspiciously astir in New York; financial ruin apparently hung on the response of the States to the plan for calling in the old, discredited currency; the Army remained too weak for an offensive.

    Washington

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