Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Obsolete spelling of meet.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Thow myghtest bettre meete myst on Malverne Hilles

    This One's A Cracker

  • Moreouer, vpon Easter euen, we were called vnto the tent, and there came forth to meete vs the foresaid agent of Bathy, saying on his masters behalfe, that we should go into their land, vnto the

    The long and wonderful voyage of Frier Iohn de Plano Carpini

  • Then presented wee the letters of our lord the Pope: but our interpreter whome we had hired and brought with vs from Kiow was not sufficiently able to interpret them, neither was there any other esteemed to bee meete for the same purpose.

    The long and wonderful voyage of Frier Iohn de Plano Carpini

  • But the citizens of Sarguit hearing this, came foorth to meete them, yeelding themselues vnto them of their owne accord.

    The long and wonderful voyage of Frier Iohn de Plano Carpini

  • Knight, who went to meete him, saying in a lowd laughter.

    The Decameron

  • It was not long, before hee heard of this conjuration made against him; and therefore hee speedily mustered up all his forces, ere he would be encompassed by two such potent kings, and marched on to meete the King of Cappadocia, leaving his Ladie and Wife (for her safety) at Lajazzo, in the custodie of a true and loyall Servant of his.

    The Decameron

  • Gracious Ladies, I am to speake of universall occasions, mingled with some misfortunes in part, and partly with matters leaning to love, as many times may happen to such people, that trace the dangerous pathes of amorous desires, or have not learned perfectly, to say S. Julians pater noster, having good beddes of their owne, yet casually meete with worser Lodging.

    The Decameron

  • They created a kinde Society, consisting of about five and twenty men, who should meete together twice in a moneth, and in a place reputed convenient for them: where being so assembled, every man uttered his minde to those two Schollers, in such cases as they most desired, to have wherwith they were all satisfied the self-same night.

    The Decameron

  • Queene, what meete recompence he should gratifie her withall, for loving and affecting him in such fervent manner.

    The Decameron

  • And when we part hence, we meete with none but dead bodies; or sicke persons transported from one place to another; or else we see running thorow the City (in most offensive fury) such as (by authoritie of publike Lawes) were banished hence, onely for their bad and brutish behaviour in contempt of those Lawes, because now they know, that the executors of them are dead and sicke.

    The Decameron

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